Gastric Bypass: Your doctor may call this "Roux-en-Y" gastric bypass, or RYGB. The surgeon leaves only a very small part of the stomach (called the pouch). That pouch can't hold a lot of food, so you eat less. The food you eat bypasses the rest of the stomach, going straight from the pouch to your small intestine. This surgery can often be done through several small incisions using a camera to see inside (laparoscope). Doctors can also perform a mini-gastric bypass, which is a similar procedure also done through a laparoscope.
But that wasn’t even the best part. The best part, according to Brittany, was the 35 pounds that “just melted right off” her 5'3", 165-pound frame. It took less than three months to shed the weight, and she never even had to step foot in the gym. Instead, she ate whenever she was hungry—it’s just that she was never hungry. At meals, she could usually stomach three or four bites before feeling full. Otherwise, she mainly subsisted on grapes and Diet Dr. Pepper.
Wouldn't it be great if losing weight were as easy as sipping on a cup of tea? As you scroll through Instagram, there’s a good chance you’ll come upon a post where a slim, all-around gorgeous celebrity or health influencer is raving about her favorite detox teas, also known as tea cleanses or teatoxes. Maybe she credits the stuff with jumpstarting her weight loss, helping her “cleanse” or debloat before a big event, or even bounce back into shape post-baby.

The keto diet also appears to help induce autophagy, which helps clear damaged cells from the body, including senescent cells that serve no functional purpose but still linger inside tissues and organs. In animal studies when rats are put on the ketogenic diet, autophagic pathways are created that reduce brain injury during and after seizures. (21)

That said, there are some amazing teas out there. Teas that taste delicious — preventing you from getting bored and picking up a sugar- and chemical-packed soda — and that can genuinely assist you in your healthy dieting goals. Some teas have "many beneficial compounds that can battle and actually block the absorption of fat," Dr. Verma says.[slideshow:
Orlistat can cause bothersome gastrointestinal side effects, such as flatulence and loose stools. It's necessary to follow a low-fat diet when taking this medication. Orlistat is also available in a reduced-strength form without a prescription (Alli). Rare cases of serious liver injury have been reported. However, no cause-and-effect relationship has been established.
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